If a tree is a tree and lacks the ability to create or change its own being, then must man actuate his own Self?

http://www.raychelark.com

A Magazine Curated By shares this exclusive portfolio of images from inside 512 hours, on the last day of Marina Abramovic’s residence at the Serpentine Gallery, London. Shot by Marco Anelli, the intimate images offer insight into the layers of meditative practice in the artist’s 64-day program, which included counting lentils and rice, and sleeping. Increasingly concerned with the public’s division into players and spectactors, Marina said ‘I’ve been thinking more and more about different types of people. The ones who really want to do things and who are completely open minded and then others who are just watching…. Watching is not experiencing.’
Read the responses of Abramovic’s visitors here on this dedicated Tumblr.
www.serpentinegalleries.org@serpentineuk

http://www.amagazinecuratedby.com/news/inside-marina-abramovics-512-hours-serpentine-gallery/

A Magazine Curated By shares this exclusive portfolio of images from inside 512 hours, on the last day of Marina Abramovic’s residence at the Serpentine Gallery, London. Shot by Marco Anelli, the intimate images offer insight into the layers of meditative practice in the artist’s 64-day program, which included counting lentils and rice, and sleeping. Increasingly concerned with the public’s division into players and spectactors, Marina said ‘I’ve been thinking more and more about different types of people. The ones who really want to do things and who are completely open minded and then others who are just watching…. Watching is not experiencing.’

Read the responses of Abramovic’s visitors here on this dedicated Tumblr.

www.serpentinegalleries.org
@serpentineuk

http://www.amagazinecuratedby.com/news/inside-marina-abramovics-512-hours-serpentine-gallery/

© Marjorie Salvaterra
With HER, she turns away from the mirror and turns the camera on her own life—examining the psychology of her age and her gender in black and white, through surreal interpretations and exaggerated gestures, reminiscent of Italian cinema, creating photographs that reflect the universal idea of womanhood and assure HER that she is not on this path alone.— Marjorie Salvaterra

© Marjorie Salvaterra

With HER, she turns away from the mirror and turns the camera on her own life—examining the psychology of her age and her gender in black and white, through surreal interpretations and exaggerated gestures, reminiscent of Italian cinema, creating photographs that reflect the universal idea of womanhood and assure HER that she is not on this path alone.

— Marjorie Salvaterra

© Paula Rae Gibson

"This selfie culture unnerves me. Not with teens, that’s a whole different thing, but every time a friend posts a selfie of herself, I think, oh dear, she’s at crisis point. She needs to keep seeing her image, know she exists, she feels her life is nothing…that she is fading away.

When my husband was diagnosed with death, our daughter was 20 weeks old. I was the last person on the planet equipped to be a single parent, let alone exist without him, and I started to take photos of myself obsessively. It was an excuse to get dressed, an excuse not to get dressed, it was proof I hadn’t disappeared…. been buried with him.”

— Paula Rae Gibson

© Yoshinori Mizutani

© Yoshinori Mizutani

© Yoshinori Mizutani
Sometimes photography without context is enough. Sometimes the lack of context gives depth to the picture, a resonance, gives us space to examine the banality of the subject and the beauty inherent in it.”— Yoshinori Mizutani

© Yoshinori Mizutani

Sometimes photography without context is enough. Sometimes the lack of context gives depth to the picture, a resonance, gives us space to examine the banality of the subject and the beauty inherent in it.”

— Yoshinori Mizutani

© Ellie Davies, Stars, 8

© Ellie Davies, Stars, 8

© Corinna Kern, George’s Bath
'George's bath' is an exploration of the world of George Fowler, 72, who is affected by hoarding. Focusing on a single location inside George’s four-bedroom house, namely his bathtub, this project detaches his condition from the clutter by that it is usually conveyed. Having lived at George’s house for two months, my attention was drawn by the constant changes taking place in his bathtub, often on an hourly basis, while the rest of his house remained still under the myriads accumulated clutter. As one of the only accessible spaces, George’s bathtub has become the place where he washes the dishes, does his laundry, stores items or repairs bikes, where he has his coffee, reads books or, last but not least, takes a bath.
—Corinna Kern

© Corinna Kern, George’s Bath

'George's bath' is an exploration of the world of George Fowler, 72, who is affected by hoarding. 
Focusing on a single location inside George’s four-bedroom house, namely his bathtub, this project detaches his condition from the clutter by that it is usually conveyed. 

Having lived at George’s house for two months, my attention was drawn by the constant changes taking place in his bathtub, often on an hourly basis, while the rest of his house remained still under the myriads accumulated clutter. 

As one of the only accessible spaces, George’s bathtub has become the place where he washes the dishes, does his laundry, stores items or repairs bikes, where he has his coffee, reads books or, last but not least, takes a bath.

—Corinna Kern

© Corinna Kern, George’s Bath
'George's bath' is an exploration of the world of George Fowler, 72, who is affected by hoarding. Focusing on a single location inside George’s four-bedroom house, namely his bathtub, this project detaches his condition from the clutter by that it is usually conveyed. Having lived at George’s house for two months, my attention was drawn by the constant changes taking place in his bathtub, often on an hourly basis, while the rest of his house remained still under the myriads accumulated clutter. As one of the only accessible spaces, George’s bathtub has become the place where he washes the dishes, does his laundry, stores items or repairs bikes, where he has his coffee, reads books or, last but not least, takes a bath.
—Corinna Kern

© Corinna Kern, George’s Bath

'George's bath' is an exploration of the world of George Fowler, 72, who is affected by hoarding. 
Focusing on a single location inside George’s four-bedroom house, namely his bathtub, this project detaches his condition from the clutter by that it is usually conveyed. 

Having lived at George’s house for two months, my attention was drawn by the constant changes taking place in his bathtub, often on an hourly basis, while the rest of his house remained still under the myriads accumulated clutter. 

As one of the only accessible spaces, George’s bathtub has become the place where he washes the dishes, does his laundry, stores items or repairs bikes, where he has his coffee, reads books or, last but not least, takes a bath.

—Corinna Kern

Nicholas Hughes, untitled #3 from Aspects of Cosmological Indifference

http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/nicholashughes

Nicholas Hughes, untitled #3 from Aspects of Cosmological Indifference

http://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/nicholashughes

Danila Tkachenko, Escape

Danila Tkachenko, Escape

What would you give your life for? Bill Viola talks Martyrs and light. 

Samantha Keely Smith

Samantha Keely Smith

Artist Samantha Keely Smith paints abstract oceanic landscapes that are at once menancing and serene, a clash of light and color that she refers to as “internal landscapes.” Using oil paint, enamel, and shellac, Smith uses an additive and subtractive process by partially destroying her progress several times before completion. This cyclical process, much like the timeless crash of ocean tides against the shore, adds an additional level of texture to her work. She shares in a 2013 interview with NeverLazy Magazine:

My images are not at all real places or even inspired by real places. They are emotional and psychological places. Internal landscapes, if you will. The tidal pull and power of the ocean makes sense to me in terms of expressing these things, and I think that is why some of the work has a feel of water about it. My work speaks of things that are timeless, and I think that for most of us the ocean represents something timeless.

Artist Samantha Keely Smith paints abstract oceanic landscapes that are at once menancing and serene, a clash of light and color that she refers to as “internal landscapes.” Using oil paint, enamel, and shellac, Smith uses an additive and subtractive process by partially destroying her progress several times before completion. This cyclical process, much like the timeless crash of ocean tides against the shore, adds an additional level of texture to her work. She shares in a 2013 interview with NeverLazy Magazine:

My images are not at all real places or even inspired by real places. They are emotional and psychological places. Internal landscapes, if you will. The tidal pull and power of the ocean makes sense to me in terms of expressing these things, and I think that is why some of the work has a feel of water about it. My work speaks of things that are timeless, and I think that for most of us the ocean represents something timeless.

© Letizia Battaglia, Palermo, 1992. Rosaria Schifani

© Letizia Battaglia, Palermo, 1992. Rosaria Schifani

© Peter Hujar - Portrait of Susan Sontag, 1975, from ‘Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture.’

© Peter Hujar - Portrait of Susan Sontag, 1975, from ‘Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture.’