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Samantha Keely Smith
Artist Samantha Keely Smith paints abstract oceanic landscapes that are at once menancing and serene, a clash of light and color that she refers to as “internal landscapes.” Using oil paint, enamel, and shellac, Smith uses an additive and subtractive process by partially destroying her progress several times before completion. This cyclical process, much like the timeless crash of ocean tides against the shore, adds an additional level of texture to her work. She shares in a 2013 interview with NeverLazy Magazine:

My images are not at all real places or even inspired by real places. They are emotional and psychological places. Internal landscapes, if you will. The tidal pull and power of the ocean makes sense to me in terms of expressing these things, and I think that is why some of the work has a feel of water about it. My work speaks of things that are timeless, and I think that for most of us the ocean represents something timeless.
© Letizia Battaglia, Palermo, 1992. Rosaria Schifani
© Peter Hujar - Portrait of Susan Sontag, 1975, from ‘Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture.’
© Sutanta Aditya, Sinabung mount spews ash to the air during an eruption near from Karo, North Sumatra on Jan. 8, 2014
Silence: Shapes

In 2010 Filippo Minelli  started taking photos of smoke-bombs in romantic landscapes to juxtapose the beauty of nature with the violence of a medium devoted to create chaos with a stunning result. Images taken in various areas around Europe

Renée Louise Anderson, Running Free

Elle Hanley, Parallel Creatures
© Sutanta Aditya, Mount Sinabung spewing ash in Indonesia
© The Odd Life of Timothy Green
Amy Powell, Erica & I

<http://www.featureshoot.com/2013/11/photographer-relives-her-childhood-by-taking-portraits-of-her-much-younger-sister/>
Valeriya Kutsan, 2D Or Not 2D.
Kutsan, makeup artist, teamed up with photographer Alexander Khoklov and post-processing expert Veronica Ershova, using a breathtaking array of techniques to paint the faces of models to resemble the flat, two-dimensional works of famous 20th-century artists.
Javier Pérez Turns Everyday Objects into Whimsical Illustration
Endia Beal, Can I Touch It
http://www.slate.com/blogs/behold/2013/10/15/endia_beal_can_i_touch_it_explores_gender_race_and_generational_gaps_in.html
© Javier Gallego, Portraits